Blog Archives

Bird of the Day

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Throwback Thursday

This was taken August 1, 2017 at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge.

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A Little Bashful

Finally saw a Woodpecker but he/she is a little shy.

After he left this tree he flew to a swing and started to do some acrobatics.

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Mohawk

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A Little DIY Project

On Pinterest I saw a lot of DIY birdbath ideas that looked fairly simple to make. So this evening I decided to make one.

My goal was to take photos of each step but once you are in a flow you sometimes forget to pause to take a pic of the progress.

What I used:

  • 4 plastic flower pots
  • PVC pipe about 2 1/2 feet (left from a past project).
  • Metal serving tray
  • Spray paint (left from a past project)
  • Gorilla glue
  • Gravel & a few stone for a fish tank

I think if you bought all the items you would spend approximately $20.00/$25.00. The gravel and stone choices will vary the price a bit.

I spent a total of $11.00 for this project. Most of the stuff I already had left over from other projects.

I drilled a 1 inch hole in the bottom of the pots then I painted them.

While I waited for them to dry I put the PVC in the ground about 6 inches.

Now that the pots have dried I put them over the PVC and glued them together.

Once I was satisfied with that, I put the serving tray on top and glued to the top of the flower pot.

Now it is time to add the gravel, stone, and water.

Tomorrow I will add some touchup paint to cover where the glue dripped and take a picture from the top so you can see the gravel and stone I used.

I will be putting mulch and edging around it to make it stand out a bit more.

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Eyes Wide Shut

Today I went to a local nursery called Pope’s Garden. My goal was to get some pictures of flowers for my Flower of the Day post.

I pictured of some great flowers that I hope to add to my collection soon.

A great surprise was waiting for me…4 BABY BIRDS and one unhatched egg.

They must have recently hatched as their eyes were just these big black spots on sort tiny fragile bodies.

Their bodies are laying on top of each other’s so it’s a little hard to see the 4th one.

The owner of Pope’s Garden says that they are baby Wrens.

Thanks for visiting I hope you enjoyed my surprise too!

Sparrow

Chirping Sparrow

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Tufted Titmouse

Here is an excerpt from All About Birds

A little gray bird with an echoing voice, the Tufted Titmouse is common in eastern deciduous forests and a frequent visitor to feeders. The large black eyes, small, round bill, and brushy crest gives these birds a quiet but eager expression that matches the way they flit through canopies, hang from twig-ends, and drop in to bird feeders. When a titmouse finds a large seed, you’ll see it carry the prize to a perch and crack it with sharp whacks of its stout bill.

 

 

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What you talking about Willis

This Cardinal refused to pose for me. He was either giving me a side eye look or turning around and giving me his backside.

But then I get this….

When I looked at the image it brought back a memory from a childhood TV show, Different Strokes. When Arnold always ask Willis “what you talking about?`.

Do any of you remember that show?

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Bird on a a Wire

I hope you won’t mind all of my postings of Hummingbirds, it is so fascinating to watch them fly in and out.

Per Wikipedia…..“They are known as hummingbirds because of the humming sound created by their beating wings which flap at high frequencies audible to humans. They hover in mid-air at rapid wing-flapping rates, which vary from around 12 beats per second in the largest species, to in excess of 80 in some of the smallest. Of those species that have been measured in wind tunnels, their top speed exceeds 15 m/s (54 km/h; 34 mph) and some species can dive at speeds in excess of 22 m/s (79 km/h; 49 mph).

I noticed while watching this particular hummingbird that the red on his neck changes to black depending on how the light hits it or the way he moves his head.

I still have to figure out the best settings to get sharp images.

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